Nightclub bartender Free class

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Nightclub bartender

Learn the class

The primary role of a bartender is to make alcoholic drinks to be delivered from the bar to the guests. Bartenders can be found at all hospitality-oriented institutions. Bartenders at clubs, however, are fundamentally different than those at restaurants or bars.

 

Nightclub bartender
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There's also a major difference between an ordinary barkeep and a quality bartender, or "mixologist", who besides simply putting out drinks, entertains guests, creates a spectacle with flying bottles, makes out-of-this-world cocktails, spits fire, and simply has an attractive flair and positive energy.

 

Nightclub bartender 02
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The job of a club bartender is in the spotlight in clubs with a large, central bar. In this case they are the center of attention, and must entertain all club guests… they are the life of the party.

IN ORDER TO BE SUCCESSFUL IN THE 21ST CENTURY CLUB SCENE, YOU MUST BE AN EXCELLENT PERFORMER AND PARTY-ATMOSPHERE STARTER. YOU SHOULD ALSO POSSESS THE FOLLOWING TRAITS:

Above all, in order to be successful you need to: 

  • Be a party person, and a big fan of music and a good time… this should come naturally 
  • Be physically attractive, lean, and capable of high-output cardio training. Low-weight, high-rep workouts are key…
  • Have good short-term memory in order to keep track of the drinks that guests request
  • Be good in dealing with money and basic calculations
  • Be a show master, with limitless flair… this requires lots of practice juggling bottles and other stunts which will leave your guests breathless
  • Be prepared to make an amazing cocktail. Under no circumstance should you be frugal with liquor, making diluted drinks
  • Learn some magic tricks, something to keep your guests amazed
  • Maintain a sexy and seductive attitude
  • Be quick and efficient when it comes to drink delivery
  • Be familiar with all offered drinks and prices in your bar
  • Be ready to pop open a bottle of champagne with style, in the event that a guest orders bottle-service at your bar
  • Smile and be pleasant with all guests, even if they’re not as generous as you thought they would be
  •  To always be surrounded by beautiful girls or guys, avoiding affairs with most of them.
  • Always have a lighter on hand, and provide it to your guests
  • Always be freshly bathed, well-groomed, and smelling good when reporting to work
  • Don’t flirt with guests who have caught the eye of other guests at your bar
  • Never ask your guests to leave you a tip
  • A nice smile is very important
  • Make sure to maintain fresh breath with the help of mints and such
  •  If you’re exhausted and unable to fulfill your role as bartender, take the night off
  • Don’t drink or do drugs while at work, or prior to going to work
  • Establish good contacts
  • Treat good guests with free drinks, in agreement with the club of course, in order to keep them coming back and increasing your chances for good tips
  •  

BAR MANAGER JOB DESCRIPTION

  • Ordering regular stock-takes and ordering as necessary
  • Handling deliveries
  • Maintaining the condition of liquors
  • Dealing with unsatisfied guests at the bar
  • Bar staff training
  • Direct and manage staff members to meet standards and objectives
  • Health, safety, fire and hygiene - standards – training
  • Liaise with suppliers and sales representatives
  • Full report to the Club Manager
  • Control and plans activities of a bar
  • Full responsibility for the head bartender, bartenders, bar-backs and dish washing staff
  •  

BOTTLE NAMES ACCORDING TO SIZE

 

BOTTLE NAMES ACCORDING TO SIZE
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  • Quarter (not illustrated) 18.75 cl
  • Half-Bottle 37.5 cl
  • Bottle 75 cl
  • Magnum 1.5 l
  • Jeroboam 3 l
  • Rehoboam 4.5 l
  • Methuselah 6 l
  • Salmanazar 9 l
  • Balthazar 12 l
  • Nebuchadnezzar 15 l

 

HISTORY OF BARTENDING

 

bartender job
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Bartending can be traced back thousands of years to the ancient times, when the Greco-Roman and Oriental societies introduced the culture of drinking in collective, public institutions. Public houses (or “pubs”) as they’re known now, served as places for people to come together both casually and professionally. They could discuss everything from politics and business, to sex and humor. Until about 500 years ago, most pub owners were brewers, vintners, or farmers who were already in the business of alcohol production, and simply started selling their liquor to guests, in their very own taverns.

Western European bars of the time were frequented by people from all rungs of the social ladder. Because of the increase in interest for public houses, they began showing up in every town and village. Bar owners became part of the social elite. The fact that they associated with artists, businessmen, clergy, and farmers alike, made them prominent figures in the eyes of all people. Many would argue that the status accompanying quality bartenders and bar owners still exists today.

The art and practice of bartending has experienced many rough patches throughout history. Different periods of prohibition around the world, most notably in the United States, gave bartenders an image of rebellion, mystery, and fearlessness. Bartenders who continued to supply high society, particularly mobsters, with alcoholic beverages were very well compensated. In short, bartenders have always been and will continue to be somewhat enigmatic figures of society.

 

COCKTAILS

 

COCKTAILS

 

Cocktails are drinks made from liquors or wine mixed with various ingredients. They could contain anything imaginable, including; sugars, fruits, vegetables, mint leaves, spices, chocolate, coffee…. even bacon. The origins of the cocktail are unclear, but for the past several hundred years they’ve been evolving into increasingly radical and delicious concoctions. The most popular cocktails today are martinis, shooters, and tropical drinks.

 

BARTENDING TOOLS

 

Bar Organizers

Bar Organizers

Bar Spoons

Bar Spoons

Bar Towels and Clips

Bar Towels and Clips

Bottle Openers and Catchers

Bottle Openers and Catchers

Citrus Squeezers

Citrus Squeezers

Coasters

Coasters

Cocktail Napkin Dispenser

Cocktail Napkin Dispenser

Condiment Dispensers

Condiment Dispensers

Cork Screws and Extractors

Cork Screws and Extractors

Cutting Boards

Cutting Boards

Funnels and Pumps

Funnels and Pumps

Glass Hangers

Glass Hangers

Glass Rimmers

Glass Rimmers

Jiggers

Jiggers

Juice Storage Containers

Juice Storage Containers

Liquor Pourers

Liquor Pourers

Malt Cups

Malt Cups

Mats and Shelf Liner

Mats and Shelf Liner

Muddlers

Muddlers

Overflow Pipes

Overflow Pipes

Strainers and Shakers

Strainers and Shakers

Straw Dispensers

Straw Dispensers

Wine and Champagne Stoppers

Wine and Champagne Stoppers

Wine Buckets, Stands and Chillers

Wine Buckets, Stands and Chillers

 

SHAKERS

The Boston Shaker:

The Boston Shaker

 

 

This shaker is composed of two pieces. A metal base and a mixing glass are brought together and shaken. Boston shakers do not contain integrated strainers, therefore if you make a cocktail containing crushed ice you must either have a strainer on hand, or carefully separate the base and mixing glass, creating a very small gap in order to avoid pouring excess ice into the serving glass.

 

The Cobbler Shaker:

 

The Cobbler Shaker

 

The Cobbler shaker is the most familiar cocktail shaker, and is probably the most common one found in people’s homes. It is composed of a base, built-in strainer, and a cap. It can be operated with one hand after some practice, and doesn’t require an additional strainer. The cap is also often used as a measure when adding ingredients to the base.

 

The French Shaker:

 

The French Shaker

 

The French shaker is composed of two metal parts. Both the base and cap are of similar dimensions, with the cap having a slightly smaller diameter in order to fit into the base. As is the case with Boston shakers, you will have to carefully pour its contents, or alternatively have a strainer on hand.

 

BOTTLE AND WINE OPENERS

There is a countless number of different bottle and wine openers.

Basic metal bottle opener:

 

Basic metal bottle opener

 

The most basic bottle opener is a metal one with a sort of oval opening. It is relatively easy to use by anyone, and always gets the job done.

 

Corkscrew:

 

Corkscrew

 

The conventional "corkscrew" wine opener, however, requires some skill and practice before you can quickly and neatly open bottles. There are many modern wine openers that are much more practical and would make your life a whole lot easier, but the old-fashioned "corkscrew" is still the most professional and appreciated by guests.

 

Strainers

 

Strainers

 

Strainers are used in conjunction with shakers, and function to prevent any unwanted ice and large ingredients from entering a serving glass after having been shaken. The most common strainer used in bars is the "Hawthorne", with the "Julep" strainer being used by some mixologists.

 

Muddlers

 

Muddlers

 

Muddlers are used to ground or mash fruits, vegetables, herbs, or other ingredients once they’ve been added to the other contents of a cocktail. Muddling these components helps to release and intensify their flavor. In the past most muddlers have been wooden, but now the more popular choice are metal and plastic alternatives.

 

Jiggers

 

Jiggers

 

Jiggers are small metal measuring containers, often resembling double-sided shot glasses. They have measuring cones on either end, ranging in size from .75 to 1.5 ounces (20-45ml), and ensure consistent cocktail quality.

 

Blenders

 

Blenders

 

Electric blenders are used for preparing frozen tropical drinks, as well as for the preparation of ice and other ingredients in general. Pina Coladas, Margaritas, and Daiquiris are the first to come to mind when frozen drinks are mentioned. Blenders come in many shapes and sizes, with most of them being equally effective in performing their intended tasks.

 

Juicers

 

Juicers

 

Juicers are used for extracting fresh juice from fruits and vegetables. Freshly squeezed juices are exponentially better than canned or bottled alternatives, and can make all the difference in your cocktails.

 

Ice equipment

 

Ice equipment

 

Ice is probably the most used ingredient at any bar. Buckets, tongs, crushers, bags are all part of the ice handling family. Ice machines can be a very welcome appliance, seeing as constantly retreiving ice bags can be a hassle. It’s very important to avoid handling ice with your bare hands… use the equipment.

 

TYPES OF COCKTAIL GLASSES

Highball and lowball glasses

 

Highball and lowball glasses

 

Highball glasses are most often used for mixed drinks that are usually served in 10-14 ounce (300-400ml) portions. More often than not these drinks contain cubed or crushed ice, and are not purely alcoholic (contain tonic or juices). The glasses are typically cylindrical with smooth edges. Lowball glasses are usually used for smaller portions of mixed drinks, or for serving scotch or bourbon, with ice being added when the guest specifies that they want their drink “on the rocks”. They usually have a capacity of 8-10 ounces (250-300ml).

Martini glasses

 

Martini glasses

 

The classic cocktail glass, or martini glass, has a characteristic long-stem, wide-rim shape. The glass is designed this way in order to prevent ingredients from separating and settling at the bottom. They are used to serve martinis and a variety of other mixed drinks. They ordinarily have a volume of about 9 ounces (250ml).

Shot glasses

 

Shot glasses

 

Don’t be fooled by their size… shot glasses may be the smallest piece of glassware in the bar cabinet, but they pack the strongest punch. Shooters, as they’re also referred to as, usually have a capacity of 1.5 ounces (45ml). Their contents are most often consumed in one brave swallow. You can serve vodka, absinthe, scotch, bourbon, and other liquors in shot glasses.

Wine glasses

 

Wine glasses

 

Muddlers are used to ground or mash fruits, vegetables, herbs, or other ingredients once they’ve been added to the other contents of a cocktail. Muddling these components helps to release and intensify their flavor. In the past most muddlers have been wooden, but now the more popular choice are metal and plastic alternatives.

Champagne flutes

 

Champagne flutes

 

Champagne flutes are used to serve the sparkling white wine named after the region in France where Champagne is produced. The long narrow shape of Champagne flutes is designed to prevent the bubbly from going flat, and to accentuate the visual effect of the floating bubbles. They can be used to serve any Champagne-based cocktail as well as tonic water. They usually have a volume of 7 ounces (200ml).

Brandy and Cognac snifters

 

Brandy and Cognac snifters

 

Snifters have a design similar to wine and martini glasses, the difference being that the bowl of snifters is meant to be held in the palm of the hand, thereby warming the contents. The rim of the bowl is narrower than the base of the bowl, a design cue intended to keep the aroma of the brandy or cognac from evaporating. They usually have a volume of about 12 ounces (350ml).

Hurricane glasses

 

Hurricane glasses

 

Hurricane glasses are most commonly used to serve tropical cocktails, but can also be used for other cocktails or soft drinks. They often have a garnishing umbrella or cherry on top. They have a volume of around 10 ounces (300ml).

 

BAR TERMINOLOGY

 

BAR TERMINOLOGY

 

Shaking

Shaking is performed with one of the three most common cocktail shakers. You should shake cocktails when they contain syrups, herbs, sours, eggs, dairy products, or any ingredients of a thicker consistency. The most important thing to remember when mixing cocktails is to always put the ice in the shaker before the liquor and other ingredients. This way all of the components will be equally chilled.

Stirring

Stirring is more appropriate for delicate drinks which shouldn’t contain any ice chips. Vodka or gin based cocktails, for instance, should always be stirred. Be careful not to stir too long, because you will risk melting the ice and diluting the drink. Ordinarily 10-15 swirls should do the trick.

Blending

Electric blenders are ordinarily used for sweet tropical drinks. They are ideal for cocktails containing lots of ice or firm ingredients, which would otherwise be impossible to blend with a standard shaker. Stirring is more appropriate for delicate drinks which shouldn’t contain any ice chips. Vodka or gin based cocktails, for instance, should always be stirred. Be careful not to stir too long, because you will risk melting the ice and diluting the drink. Ordinarily 10-15 swirls should do the trick.

Floating

Floating is a technique used when making cocktails such as the “stoplight”. There are 2 or more layers that should not mix with each other. Creating these layers requires some talent, but is often done by pouring the liquor or ingredient over the back of a demitasse spoon, creating a consistent, floating layer.

Frosting

Frosting can be done to martini glasses, hurricane glasses, shots, beer mugs, etc. You simply soak the glass in water and put it in the freezer. When it comes time to serve a drink simply remove the frozen glass from the freezer, and pour the drink. This is especially welcome on hot summer days at the beach or by the pool.

  • What are the methods that bartenders use for stealing?
  • What are the things that you should never do as a bartender?
  • How to recognize a good guest in front of a Club?
  • How does Club Staff make money on a side. Be aware of a “trusted” Checker / Cashier.
  • How to get promoted on your work
  • How to treat VIP guests and Big Spenders so they will become your regular Venue costumers.
  • Night Clubs potential problems and resolution skills (Intoxication, Club Weapon issues, Problematic Guests, Guests who are unable to pay the bill, Overdose situations, Drug & Drug dealers, Club-wide Brawl, Under-age guests and fake IDs)
  • How to establish your city as a PARTY destination?
  • What does Server / Waiter need to do to earn higher tips
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Check your knowledge!

1. Handling ice with bare hands can get you fired.

2. Unique and exciting attractions are very important for a destination’s image.

3. VIP-style clubs have dance floors.

4. Who are spoiled guests?

5. A dancer’s job is to amuse guests from a distance.

6. When guests ask for dancer to join their table, what should the dancer do?

7. When two guests get physical with each other, security needs to escort them from the club and let them continue fighting.

8. Friskers are exclusively men.

9. Bars and nightclubs are the same thing.

10. What background knowledge is good for a dancer to have?